You know it’s not a good idea to look directly at the Sun, don’t you? But, all the same, we are magnetically drawn to sunsets, aren’t we?

Who can resist them?

Watching the huge glowing red ball of fire sink below the horizon is a treat which never becomes mundane. I don’t remember ever noticing the sun setting and thinking, “ho hum”. It draws me towards it.

Sometimes I just watch it through my window, but often I feel almost compelled to go outside and watch. As if moving a few metres closer to it gives me a better view! But, actually, I think the reason I’m drawn outside to see it is that I want to see the breadth of the sunset, want to be able to see the colours in the sky change from one edge of the horizon to the next. It’s not enough to see it enclosed in a window frame.

I read the other day that John Ruskin (you’re going to come across him a lot this year – it’s the 200th anniversary of his birth) like to watch the dawn and the sunset every day. I can understand that.

Here’s last night’s sunset. After the sun has disappeared below the horizon and I can’t see it directly any more.

And here’s a phenomenon I’ve written about before, which entrances me every single time – it’s “The Belt of Venus” – which appears on the Western horizon at dawn, just as the Sun is appearing in the East, this morning.